Hall of Fame: Pie Traynor (1948)

Got it, just like all the other ones.

 Year Ag Tm  Lg  G   AB    R    H   2B 3B  HR  RBI  SB CS  BB  SO   BA   OBP   SLG *OPS+  TB   SH
+--------------+---+----+----+----+---+--+---+----+---+--+---+---+-----+-----+-----+----+----+---+
1920 21 PIT NL 17 52 6 11 3 1 0 2 1 3 3 6 .212 .268 .308 63 16 0
1921 22 PIT NL 7 19 0 5 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 .263 .300 .263 48 5 0
1922 23 PIT NL 142 571 89 161 17 12 4 81 17 3 27 28 .282 .319 .375 78 214 13
1923 24 PIT NL 153 616 108 208 19 19 12 101 28 13 34 19 .338 .377 .489 125 301 6
1924 25 PIT NL 142 545 86 160 26 13 5 82 24 18 37 26 .294 .340 .417 100 227 13
1925 26 PIT NL 150 591 114 189 39 14 6 106 15 9 52 19 .320 .377 .464 108 274 13
1926 27 PIT NL 152 574 83 182 25 17 3 92 8 38 14 .317 .361 .436 109 250 26
1927 28 PIT NL 149 573 93 196 32 9 5 106 11 22 11 .342 .370 .455 114 261 35
1928 29 PIT NL 144 569 91 192 38 12 3 124 12 28 10 .337 .370 .462 113 263 42
1929 30 PIT NL 130 540 94 192 27 12 4 108 13 30 7 .356 .393 .472 111 255 24
1930 31 PIT NL 130 497 90 182 22 11 9 119 7 48 19 .366 .423 .509 124 253 23
1931 32 PIT NL 155 615 81 183 37 15 2 103 6 54 28 .298 .354 .416 107 256 8
1932 33 PIT NL 135 513 74 169 27 10 2 68 6 32 20 .329 .373 .433 118 222 7
1933 34 PIT NL 154 624 85 190 27 6 1 82 5 35 24 .304 .342 .372 104 232 16
1934 35 PIT NL 119 444 62 137 22 10 1 61 3 21 27 .309 .341 .410 98 182 2
1935 36 PIT NL 57 204 24 57 10 3 1 36 2 10 17 .279 .323 .373 84 76 3
1937 38 PIT NL 5 12 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 .167 .167 .167 -9 2 0
+--------------+---+----+----+----+---+--+---+----+---+--+---+---+-----+-----+-----+----+----+---+
17 Seasons 7559 2416 164 1273 46 278 .320 .362 .435 107 231
1941 1183 371 58 158 472 3289

2 All-Star games (1933, 1934)

Harold Joseph Traynor was born on November 11, 1899 in Framingham, Massachusetts. His nickname came from his constant desire to eat pies (not very original, eh?). He played baseball in his youth, but the two Boston teams showed no desire in the young shortstop.

Barney Dreyfuss of the Pittsburgh Pirates decided to bring him, however, in 1920 as a 21-year old shortstop, but they soon decided after two seasons that he was better suited to play third base. Traynor had a good batting average and was a good hitter overall, but he was really known for his glove. He played before Gold Gloves, but many believe he was the best defensive third baseman of all-time before Frank Robinson broke into the league. He could make all plays look easy, especially bunts and choppers, with his smooth glove and strong arm.

Offensively, he wasn’t too shabby, either. His career .320 batting average showed his ability to hit, but unfortunately, he played in spacious Forbes Field, which depressed his home run numbers. He still drove in loads of runs and hit lots of doubles. Traynor would help the Pirates to a World Series in 1925, teaming up with defensive specialist Glenn Murray on the left side of the infield. By 1934, Traynor’s playing career was all but over, but he did take over the managerial reins of the Pirates. He managed for six seasons and won the second-most games (at that point) as a Pirate manager, but he would ultimately find his calling in scouting. He would do it until his death.

Eleven years after his retirement in 1937, Traynor was barely elected to the Hall of Fame in 1948 with 76.9% of the votes (93 of 121 — just two more than necessary).

An interesting note, Traynor is the only player in major-league history to steal home during the All-Star Game.

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